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Raptors Making Kyle Lowry Rest That Giant Chip He Carries

By Frank McLean

The Kyle Lowry we have watched in his time as a Toronto Raptor has been a little ball of hate. Standing six-foot-one he is a guard who after 11-years in the NBA still plays with a gigantic chip on his shoulder still thinking that he has to prove to everyone that he deserves the accolades he’s earned.

Now that style of play has endeared him to his fans and Raptors management, but he has had trouble staying healthy for a full season and come playoff time needle on the gas tank is in that red spot on the gauge telling you that you better get to a gas station fast because you are just about to run out.

After signing a three year 100-million dollar contract extension this past summer, which 93-million is guaranteed, the Raptors want to be able to keep him fresh, limit the injuries and get some playoff bang for the buck they signed him to.

Now this isn’t something new. Lowry was talking about this earlier this week after a practice in a conversation with the media. “It’s something we’ve been working on. We talked about it the last three years. Now we’re doing it.”

Coming into Wednesday night’s home tilt against Charlotte Lowry had only played 37-minutes in a game twice. Last year he did that in 12 of the team’s first 19 games and he’s averaging almost five fewer minutes a game than last season.

A major factor for the team being able to cut Lowry’s minutes has been the play of Delon Wright, before he separated his shoulder and Fred VanVleet which has resulted in Raptors head coach Dwane Casey not being afraid to use his duo of backup guards in games.

So as the team hit the quarter pole with their 20th game of the season against Charlotte, Lowry’s statistical numbers were noticeably lower to start the year.

He’s dishing dimes as per usual, but his scoring has been way down. It’s not for a lack of playing hard as he is one of the league’s leaders at drawing charges and his rebounding is second best on the Raptors.

Lowry though has not been happy with his start of his season.

One thing Lowry was saying is that they still haven’t figured out how many minutes a game he will play.

“Me, personally, I don’t know it. I’m either gonna play or I’m not,” Lowry said. “I think the coaches have done a great job with it. I don’t know how many minutes I’m averaging, but I can definitely tell the difference with being given more rest. I’m feeling fresh. I’m feeling good. At the same time, when I’m playing a lot of minutes I get a little bit of a rhythm.”

“Nobody’s really playing huge minutes,” Casey said about how much Lowry will play. “Now, we’re going to have the right to extend those minutes if we need Kyle Lowry or we need DeMar DeRozan in a game but we don’t want to make it a habit.”

And yes there won’t be a set number of minutes here for Lowry because there are going to be night’s where bench players get into foul trouble or injuries may dictate that he will play more, but in the end this strategy will help come playoff time.

A healthy Lowry will be needed if this team is going to get back to the conference finals. We have seen in past playoff’s when Lowry is injured, opponents just key on DeMar DeRozan and can take away the Raptors offense from the guard position. Then teams can key on Serge Ibaka and down goes the entire offense.

Kyle Lowry is what New York Yankees slugger Reggie Jackson used to say about himself, “he’s the straw that stirs the drink”.

Come playoff time it’s hoped Lowry will still have plenty of gas in the tank and that there won’t be a need to find the nearest gas station.

 

   

DeMar DeRozan & Frank McLeanVeteran journalist Frank McLean has covered nearly every Raptors game in Toronto since their inaugural season at the Skydome back in 1995-96. He has seen it all. The good, the bad and the really bad and he is one of the very few journalists in Toronto that has kept coming back for more.

  Featured image courtesy of Larry Millson