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NBA Toronto Raptors rookie Terence Davis

Raptors Bet On Undrafted Rookie With Huge Hands

If you’ve been looking for a big name or proven veteran to bolster the Raptors rotation for the upcoming season, President Masai Ujiri hasn’t been listening. After signing a pair of young forwards that weren’t given a new contract by their old clubs, Ujiri has dipped back into the undrafted pool of talent to scoop up a combo guard from Ole Miss, Terence Davis.

If Ujiri hadn’t proven himself to be a pretty good judge of overlooked talent (see Fred VanVleet), one could be convinced the Raptors were giving up on defending their NBA title. (still T.B.D.)

Never really an NBA draft prospect, Davis had a strong senior year and turned down two-way NBA contracts to sign with Denver for summer league and betting on himself appears to have paid off. After all, he was gaining attention for all the right reasons as described in his Ole Miss profile.

Davis had his best season to finish his Ole Miss career.

Davis’ final shooting numbers included 44.4 percent (179 of 403) from the field, 37.1 percent (65 of 175) from beyond the arc and 77.2 percent (78 of 101) from the free throw line. He also produced four of the team’s five double-doubles throughout the season, including a night of 25 points and 12 rebounds versus No. 6 Kentucky (March 5) during his last game in The Pavilion.

Behind Davis’ senior leadership on and off the floor, Ole Miss returned to the NCAA Tournament for the first time in four years. The Rebels were predicted to finish last in the SEC, but Davis and company exceeded expectations en route to a 20-13 record

From not even on the NBA radar as a college rookie, Davis’ game improved at both ends of the court and while he still has a long ways to go, the promise of becoming a “microwave” scorer and solid defender is there as described in a detailed SB Nation Grizzly Bear Blues article.

Defensively, I love his versatility at that end. At 6’4” with his 6’8” wingspan, he has the size to guard positions 1-3. In addition, he possesses the lateral quickness to not get torched at the next level.

Unlike most stereotypical 3-and-D players, Davis has a solid first step and can create his own shot. With this skill, he can get hot from the field super quick and get on a nice scoring run.

he has the athleticism and explosiveness to thrive in transition. He’s also a strong rebounder for a smaller player, and he could capitalize on that skill to ignite the fast-break.

That is a description for how Raptors head coach Nick Nurse wants to play and if Davis can handle the transition to the NBA smoothly, he’ll find minutes off the bench.

Another reason Ujiri was probably attracted to Davis (aside from the fact he’ll be a cheap addition to a team that doesn’t have a lot of flexibility), is an apparent level of toughness that Ujiri has coveted since the day he started rebuilding the Raptors into an organization other teams have been forced to respect. Davis probably should have played football instead of basketball coming out of high school according to Matthew del Rio of SB Nation Liberty Ballers.

An NBA future wasn’t always in the cards for Terence Davis. Five years ago, he was a highly touted high school wide receiver and received scholarship offers from twenty power conference schools. “I was a 6-4 wide receiver with long arms and huge hands who could catch everything that came my way.” Davis (said.)

despite improving by leaps and bounds during his time at Ole Miss, an NBA career was unlikely. Following his junior season, Davis entered his name in the NBA Draft but chose to return to school after it became clear he was a long shot

But his improved play last year and his physical measurements suggested someone should be giving him a harder look.

Davis received an invitation to the 2019 NBA Draft Combine. Although Davis impressed in both combine scrimmages — he shot 12-for-21 from the field — his measurements were what stood out. The 6-foot-4.5 shooting guard’s wingspan measurement is listed as 6-foot-8.75. Of the four combine participants whose hand width measurements are listed as 10.75 inches, Davis is the only one shorter than 6-foot-8.75.

Raptors fans won’t have forgotten the advantage of having monster hands on defense can have after last season. For comparison, Kawhi Leonard’s hands are 11.25 inches in width. Rajon Rondo, whose hands are huge for a guard, are actually smaller at 10 inches.

Ujiri has decided to give another late bloomer in college who has shown leadership potential and a two-way game a chance to develop in a system that has proven to be very effective at producing NBA players. This kid has the tools, the Raptors hope he has the talent to go with them.

In fairness, look for Davis to start out playing significant time with the Raptors 905 in the G-League, but like previous players Ujiri has sent down, if he impresses, he’ll get his shot with the big club quickly enough.

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at Scotiabank Arena and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.