Tag Archives: NBA free agents

You are here: Home / Archive
NBA Toronto Raptors rookie Terence Davis

Raptors Bet On Undrafted Rookie With Huge Hands

If you’ve been looking for a big name or proven veteran to bolster the Raptors rotation for the upcoming season, President Masai Ujiri hasn’t been listening. After signing a pair of young forwards that weren’t given a new contract by their old clubs, Ujiri has dipped back into the undrafted pool of talent to scoop up a combo guard from Ole Miss, Terence Davis.

If Ujiri hadn’t proven himself to be a pretty good judge of overlooked talent (see Fred VanVleet), one could be convinced the Raptors were giving up on defending their NBA title. (still T.B.D.)

Never really an NBA draft prospect, Davis had a strong senior year and turned down two-way NBA contracts to sign with Denver for summer league and betting on himself appears to have paid off. After all, he was gaining attention for all the right reasons as described in his Ole Miss profile.

Davis had his best season to finish his Ole Miss career.

Davis’ final shooting numbers included 44.4 percent (179 of 403) from the field, 37.1 percent (65 of 175) from beyond the arc and 77.2 percent (78 of 101) from the free throw line. He also produced four of the team’s five double-doubles throughout the season, including a night of 25 points and 12 rebounds versus No. 6 Kentucky (March 5) during his last game in The Pavilion.

Behind Davis’ senior leadership on and off the floor, Ole Miss returned to the NCAA Tournament for the first time in four years. The Rebels were predicted to finish last in the SEC, but Davis and company exceeded expectations en route to a 20-13 record

From not even on the NBA radar as a college rookie, Davis’ game improved at both ends of the court and while he still has a long ways to go, the promise of becoming a “microwave” scorer and solid defender is there as described in a detailed SB Nation Grizzly Bear Blues article.

Defensively, I love his versatility at that end. At 6’4” with his 6’8” wingspan, he has the size to guard positions 1-3. In addition, he possesses the lateral quickness to not get torched at the next level.

Unlike most stereotypical 3-and-D players, Davis has a solid first step and can create his own shot. With this skill, he can get hot from the field super quick and get on a nice scoring run.

he has the athleticism and explosiveness to thrive in transition. He’s also a strong rebounder for a smaller player, and he could capitalize on that skill to ignite the fast-break.

That is a description for how Raptors head coach Nick Nurse wants to play and if Davis can handle the transition to the NBA smoothly, he’ll find minutes off the bench.

Another reason Ujiri was probably attracted to Davis (aside from the fact he’ll be a cheap addition to a team that doesn’t have a lot of flexibility), is an apparent level of toughness that Ujiri has coveted since the day he started rebuilding the Raptors into an organization other teams have been forced to respect. Davis probably should have played football instead of basketball coming out of high school according to Matthew del Rio of SB Nation Liberty Ballers.

An NBA future wasn’t always in the cards for Terence Davis. Five years ago, he was a highly touted high school wide receiver and received scholarship offers from twenty power conference schools. “I was a 6-4 wide receiver with long arms and huge hands who could catch everything that came my way.” Davis (said.)

despite improving by leaps and bounds during his time at Ole Miss, an NBA career was unlikely. Following his junior season, Davis entered his name in the NBA Draft but chose to return to school after it became clear he was a long shot

But his improved play last year and his physical measurements suggested someone should be giving him a harder look.

Davis received an invitation to the 2019 NBA Draft Combine. Although Davis impressed in both combine scrimmages — he shot 12-for-21 from the field — his measurements were what stood out. The 6-foot-4.5 shooting guard’s wingspan measurement is listed as 6-foot-8.75. Of the four combine participants whose hand width measurements are listed as 10.75 inches, Davis is the only one shorter than 6-foot-8.75.

Raptors fans won’t have forgotten the advantage of having monster hands on defense can have after last season. For comparison, Kawhi Leonard’s hands are 11.25 inches in width. Rajon Rondo, whose hands are huge for a guard, are actually smaller at 10 inches.

Ujiri has decided to give another late bloomer in college who has shown leadership potential and a two-way game a chance to develop in a system that has proven to be very effective at producing NBA players. This kid has the tools, the Raptors hope he has the talent to go with them.

In fairness, look for Davis to start out playing significant time with the Raptors 905 in the G-League, but like previous players Ujiri has sent down, if he impresses, he’ll get his shot with the big club quickly enough.

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at Scotiabank Arena and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association. 

 

 

 

NBA Toronto Raptors Rondae Hollis-Jefferson free agent 2019

Raptors Give Rondae Hollis-Jefferson A Second Chance

The Toronto Raptors have signed another young forward who can’t shoot giving Nets cast-off Rondae Hollis-Jefferson a second chance to prove himself in the NBA.


Hollis-Jefferson was rounding into form as a decent mid-range shooter in his third season with Brooklyn, but last year he couldn’t find the basket from any range and in today’s NBA a player that can’t hit the three-ball is at risk of being left behind.  It’s a short step from starter to gone in the NBA as detailed by of Nets Daily.

Rondae had a solid showing in his second year under Atkinson. He was the primary starter at the 4 and had a breakout year, averaging 13.9 points and 6.8 rebounds. However, entering this past season, Hollis-Jefferson was hobbled after straining his hip in Jeremy Lin’s charity basketball game in China.

He fell in and out of the rotation. The Nets had expanded their depth and inserted guys that played the style of ball they wanted to play.

Between the Nets’ analytical-heavy approach and their desire to clear space for free agents, the writing was on the wall.

The Nets were a team on the way up last season and the hip strain couldn’t have come at a worse time for Hollis-Jefferson. Glowing remarks about his intrinsic value to the team weren’t going to be enough get him playing time or land him a new contract in Brooklyn, but for a Raptors team trying to fill out a roster with very limited flexibility, it’s easy to see the attraction.

Rondae is a tough kid from Chester and the 7th Street Ball Courts. He wears his heart on his sleeve and puts others before himself. That’s what made him a fan favorite and that’s what made him the “heart and soul” of the Brooklyn Nets, even when he wasn’t playing much – if at all.

His gritty style of play provided a peep of optimism during a time when there was very little.

It’s only a one-year deal and if can find his third season shooting form and live up to his gritty team-first reputation, the Raptors will be able to find minutes for him.

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at Scotiabank Arena and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association. 

 

 

NBA Toronto Raptors Stanley Johnson

Raptors Sign Reclamation Project Stanley Johnson

The Toronto Raptors have signed the former Detroit Piston 2015 NBA 8th overall draft pick Stanley Johnson to a two-year $7.5 million contract that has a player option for year two as reported in Hoops Rumors  (among other places).

To put it mildly, Johnson hasn’t lived up to his draft position and the Pistons dumped him on the Pelicans last year who in turn didn’t bother issuing the 23-year-old small forward a qualifying offer.

Johnson has struggled with his offense from the beginning, shooting 37.4 percent from the field for his career, but he has been given credit as a versatile defender, so maybe Nurse can find a role for him off the bench.

His strength is his defensive prowess with the ability to guard four positions. Outside shooting (29.3% on 3-point tries) has been a major issue for Johnson at the offensive end.

Listed at 6’7 and 245 lbs, Draft Express described him as “a physical specimen with his chiseled frame” in the 2016 Summer League They also suggested, “ Johnson’s jump shot is sound mechanically and he will continue to develop the rest of his offensive game, making him one of the bright prospects in the League.”

The offensive development never happened, but there is hope, in his lone season at the University of Arizona, Johnson shot 37.1 percent from three, hitting on 43 of 116 attempts, so maybe the Raptors coaching staff can help him find his college stroke again.

A prospect, a suspect and maybe a reclamation project, the Raptors must see something in Johnson’s game to make them believe he has a chance at becoming the player scouts envisioned when he left college.

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at Scotiabank Arena and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association. 

 

 

 

 

NBA Los Angeles Clippers Kawhi Leonard 2019 champion

Can Raptors Masai Ujiri Poach Another Superstar?

Last summer Raptors President Masai Ujiri pulled off a blockbuster trade to poach Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green from the Spurs on expiring contracts and they came thru with an NBA Championship. However, Ujiri knew the risks and both players have taken their talents to L.A. in free agency leaving Toronto without a superstar for next season.

The only real questions for Masai now are, after getting to the top of the mountain:

  1. Can he be happy with rebuilding,
  2. Is merely being good heading into next season acceptable, and,
  3. Is he willing to take some big risks again in an NBA without a clear-cut favorite for the title?

“The Raptors will focus on the future and continue our pursuit of a second championship,” Ujiri said in a formal release on July 6th.

A roster with Kyle Lowry, Fred VanVleet, Norman Powell, OG Anunoby, Pascal Siakam, Serge Ibaka and Marc Gasol should be good enough to easily secure a playoff spot, but will have few expectations beyond that and this isn’t a situation Ujiri has seemed satisfied with in the past.

However, Ujiri is $20 million below the luxury tax line, has the full Mid Level Exception to play with and has $90 million in expiring contracts to dangle.

There are some good options for Ujiri in free agency if he’s happy merely improving his chances for a second round exit next spring.

  1. Recently waived veteran guard Avery Bradley would be a solid addition.
  2. Marcus Morris still needs a contract and the Raptors need depth at forward.
  3. DeMarcus Cousins would be a good add if Ujiri trades Marc Gasol.

There is still talent available, but nothing that looks like it’d give the Raptors a chance of getting by the 76ers or Bucks next spring on its own.

If Ujiri wants to gamble yet again, there are some home run balls out there to go after.

John Wall, Washington Wizards

Things haven’t gone as hoped for Wall and the Wizards and their superstar point guard isn’t expected to be back in action until after the All-Star Break as he sits out rehabbing a torn Achilles just as his four-year $170 million extension kicks in.

Arguably the 28-year-old has been one of the best point guards in the NBA averaging 19 points and 9.2 assists over 9 seasons, but his success hasn’t always translated into team success and it’s becoming obvious the Wizards would rather build around Bradley Beal than Wall.

The Wizards should be more than interested in taking on Kyle Lowry’s expiring deal to get Wall moved and Toronto should be demanding first round draft pick Rui Hachimura as compensation for taking on the risk. A high risk, high reward gamble Ujiri shouldn’t be afraid to explore.

Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City Thunder

With the Paul George trade and more first round draft picks than any team could possibly want, the Thunder have moved solidly into demolish and rebuild territory with their future aspirations many years out. Plus, OKC remains in the luxury tax even after the George trade and the Raptors have the expiring contracts to help them move on.

Like Wall, Westbrook has four-years and $170 million left on his deal, so a trade for Lowry straight up would get the Thunder out from under this deal and with Westbrook about to turn 31-years-old in November, how much more Sam Presti can get is to be determined.

What would makes things really interesting would be adding a Marc Gasol for Steven Adams swap. A bigger trade just might entice Ujiri to add in a couple of draft picks and a young player like Anunoby.

These trades sound like a Thunder salary dump, but with Russell’s agent Thad Foucher apparently requesting a trade per ESPN, that’s where things are.

Andrew Wiggins, Minnesota Timberwolves

The long coveted Canadian’s value hasn’t exactly been on the rise over the past two seasons and his max extension could be considered to have made Wiggins untradeable, but the combination of bad team chemistry, suspect player development and confusing/missing leadership from the top makes this former number one overall draft pick a prospect worthy of taking a gamble on. Plus the T-wolves can’t possibly have any reasonable expectations beyond merely off-loading Wiggins’ salary at the lowest possible cost.

Offer Serge Ibaka’s expiring deal straight up for Wiggins and see if the T-wolves are frustrated enough to take it. In the Raptors player development system, Wiggins has a chance to grow into his contract and become the player he was envisioned to be five years ago. In Minnesota, no one can see that happening.

Last summer Ujiri took a gamble on an unhappy “former” superstar and turned things into a championship. If he wants to defend that title or even just enjoy a deep playoff run, he’ll need find a way to repeat the process again.

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at Scotiabank Arena and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association. 

 

 

 

NBA Toronto Raptors Kawhi Leonard during warm-ups

Why Canadian Tax No Longer Scares NBA Free Agents

It’s mostly been misinformation that scares American athletes when it comes to paying Canadian income tax, often perpetrated by American media working in Canada who simply put, just aren’t in the right tax bracket, but any NBA free agent with an adviser worth anything will know this is one thing he doesn’t have to worry about.

As Adam Scherer, Tax Partner at Crowe Soberman LLP suggests, Ka’whi Canadian Tax may not be so bad for Leonard:

 it is not unreasonable to say that with thoughtful tax planning, Kawhi could structure his affairs in Canada so that he’s no worse off tax-wise playing for the Raptors than for a California team.

In the case that matters most to Canadians just ahead of NBA free agency, Kawhi Leonard won’t be influenced in his decision between the Los Angeles Clippers and the Toronto Raptors because of income taxes.

On the surface, the math looks relatively simple. Income taxes in Toronto, Canada are 53.5 percent total. US Federal tax is 37 percent, add in California state tax at 13.3 percent and don’t forget Medicare tax of 2.35 percent totaling 52.65 percent, making the straight up difference between L.A. and Toronto less than one percent. BUT the situation for American athletes playing in Canada is so much better than this as Scherer explains:

the Raptors calculated that their players spent 66 percent of their working days in Canada. Thus, only two thirds of his salary would be taxable in Canada. Credits are available in the U.S. for taxes paid in Canada, meaning effectively that a player pays the higher of either the Canadian tax rate or the U.S. tax rate on his working days in Canada.

So even this slight difference is reduced by a third just by filing correctly, but it gets better.

NBA rules also allow a player to earn up to 15 percent of his salary in the form of a signing bonus. As we’ve noted before, signing bonuses get unique treatment under the Canada-U.S. income tax treaty.

Signing bonuses are only taxed at 15 percent in Canada so,

it’s possible Kawhi could have $27M per year taxed in Canada at an effective rate of 45.3 percent, for a total tax obligation of $12.2M. Much lower than in California!

Now no one is going to claim an NBA free agent isn’t going to keep more of their money by playing in the state tax free franchises located in Texas or Florida, but high tax states like New York and California face the same challenges as Canada and they don’t seem to have a lot of blow back from players about this issue and with the Clippers as the Raptors main challengers for Leonard’s services, income taxes shouldn’t even be a consideration.

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at Scotiabank Arena and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

 

NBA Indiana Pacers Paul George

Is The NBA About To Get Serious About Tampering?

Tampering with another team’s player is supposed to be serious, but all too often in the NBA there is more than subtle evidence something untoward has been going on. There have been fines in the past and in very rare cases even punishment teams care about, but far too often it’s hard to say the NBA does much of anything to discourage the practice.

In the case of the Lakers and superstar Paul George, the Indiana Pacers frustration was stretched to the breaking point and they laid a complaint that the NBA appears to be taking seriously.

As Bob Kravitz on WTHR reports, “the Pacers strongly believe they have the Lakers dead to rights.”

Pacers owner Herb Simon, general manager Kevin Pritchard and some other Pacers’ officials watched the Magic Johnson yuk-it-up interview on the Jimmy Kimmel Show in April, and they were incensed.

It’s understood, everybody tampers, at least a little bit. Again, those July 1 free-agent signings do not happen in an information vacuum. Conversations are had. Texts are exchanged. It happens.

This, though, is different. This, if proven, is egregious.

“We can say hi because we know each other,” Johnson replied. “I just can’t say, ‘Hey, we want you to come to the Lakers,’ even though I’m gonna be wink-winking. You know what that means, right?”

And this was just the public side of the alleged tampering.

For weeks, even months, the Pacers had heard whispers that the Los Angeles Lakers had been making contact with Paul George’s agent, Aaron Mintz, and George’s parents.

The NBA shouldn’t even tolerate the violation of their tampering rules days ahead of a player about to enter free agency on July 1st. The playing field is supposed to be level.

However, George was under contract for another entire season when the Pacers believe the Lakers were trying to tilt the playing field to their advantage when it comes to acquiring George in 2018. The widespread belief that George wanted to go to the Lakers and the Lakers wanted him to be there undoubtedly impacted his trade value.

Suffice to say, the Pacers are angry, having lost their franchise player for dimes on the dollar.

Tampering makes it easy for super teams to be put together. There were unsubstantiated whispers LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh couldn’t have put that super team together on their own, although they did a superb job of putting on a show in free agency and this is hardly the only example.

Rumors come out about most high profile NBA players and it’s a time honored tradition in business circles, not just in pro sports, for agents, owners and management to leak information designed to “stir the pot” or move things in a particular direction if not more than this.

a couple of days before the start of free agency, which is not allowed but generally accepted as the coin of the realm. … But the league chooses to accept, or at least turn a blind eye to, that sort of thing.

The NBA shouldn’t turn a blind eye at any time and the tradition of fines for anything but the worst of offenses is not slowing down the problem.

If a level playing field is a real objective of the NBA, the burden of proof can’t be held to a standard that is so high as to be almost impossible to prove as described by Bobby Marks of ESPN.

Unless there is a paper trail, like in the case of the Timberwolves and Joe Smith, a fine is usually the penalty if the team is found to have done something negligent.

The Pacers have a right to be upset and on the surface, the Lakers look guilty. The NBA is doing an appropriate investigation, but if they find evidence of tampering beyond the very inappropriate comments of Magic on the Jimmy Kimmel Show, they need to come down hard. A fine is not enough.

However, the Paul George situation is just a potentially egregious case. The bigger issue is the “wink-winking” behind the scenes interference Magic admits is going on and the outright “stir-the-pot” moves by agents and teams that so often surface as “leaks” after the fact.

If the NBA truly wants a level playing field, tampering needs to be investigated like a civil court case where things are judged on a balance of probability/ who do you believe basis. Severe punishments shouldn’t be restricted to the paper trail or beyond a reasonable doubt criminal standard.

At this point it’s almost hard to believe the NBA investigation into the George case won’t turn up at least some evidence of tampering and if they do, it seems the only appropriate way to deal with it is to bar the Lakers from acquiring George for at least three years. It’s past time to send a strong message to the entire league that this has got to stop.

 

  

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

Featured image courtesy of Paul Saini
Instagram:  @fylmm.lifestyle and  @paul_saini

 

 

 

 

NBA Toronto Raptors Jared Sullinger

Jared Sullinger Shows Something At The Basketball Tournament

Getting hurt, traded and cut last season wasn’t how Jared Sullinger envisioned the end of his NBA career and at just 25-years-old, he’s still fighting for a spot to play somewhere next season.

Needing to showcase that’s his foot is healed and he’s back in basketball shape, Sullinger joined Ohio State’s alumni “Scarlet and Gray” playing in The Basketball Tournament (“TBT”) as reported by James Graga Jr. in Scout.com.

Sullinger said he joined the alumni team for a number of reasons. For starters, Sullinger is not currently under contract by any professional team after he was waived by the Phoenix Suns after being traded from the Toronto Raptors in February. In addition, Sullinger said he wants to prove to NBA franchises that he is still healthy. The former Ohio State star has undergone two foot surgeries in recent years and said his personal agenda for the tournament is to prove to teams he can still play at a high level.

“I am healthy. I am running up and down the floor, playing basketball and I am healthy. That is my main concern right now,” he said.

 

The Basketball Tournament is no easy ride writes Aaron Torres of The Washington Post. These are solid rosters loaded with current and former NBA players and they are motivated to win.

Sixty-four teams of various affiliations compete for a prize of $2 million in TBT.

It’s broadcast on ESPN. NBA scouts attend the games.

This year, according to TBT, 66 current and former NBA players participated in TBT, either as players or coaches, adding a sense of legitimacy to the tournament.

“These aren’t a bunch of no-names playing in this tournament,” said ESPN basketball analyst Fran Fraschilla. “These are professional athletes.”

“For Jared, this is a job interview,” Fraschilla said.

Unfortunately for Sullinger, “Scarlet and Gray” lost the semi-finals match in double overtime to Austin Day’s “Team Challenge ALS” as reported by TBT Staff.

Jared Sullinger completed a solid performance in TBT, scoring 26 points and grabbing 10 rebounds in the losing effort for Scarlet & Gray

Sullinger shot 6-12 from the field, 1-1 from three and 13-15 from the free throw line. He also had a block and two steals to go with his double-double performance.

Prior to the game Josh Brown wrote,

Sullinger has shown that he’s back at full strength after suffering two foot injuries last season. He’s averaging 14.5 ppg and 9 rpg. In typical Sullinger fashion, not only has he been very efficient around the rim but he is shooting the three ball with some success as well.

In other games:

Regional Championship: Sullinger contributed to the team’s win, scoring 15 points and grabbing eight rebounds.

Super 16: Jared Sullinger rebounded from an uneven performance in the Round 2 win to register 21 points and nine rebounds

When healthy Sullinger put up good numbers with the Boston Celtics in his first four NBA seasons. It might be hard to trust his feet at this point, but he’s someone to watch.

If he can get his weight under control (Sullinger has admitted he was fat last year), he’ll be back in the NBA at some point.

 

  

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

Featured image courtesy of Larry Millson

 

 

 

 

NBA free agent collage

NBA Free Agent Scrap Heap Bargains

Any NBA free agent still on the market at the end of July is at risk of ending up on the scrap heap and with few exceptions, their options for signing anything but a bargain NBA minimum contract for next season are getting thin.

So far NBA teams have handed out over $2 billion in new deals averaging over $12 million per season per Spotrac and only the Bulls, Suns, Mavericks and 76ers can still create over $10 million in salary cap space by renouncing their exceptions to make a significant offer to a free agent.

This off season has been marked by big trades like Paul George and Chris Paul plus big salary dumps like DeMarre Carroll and Allen Crabbe. Aside from Gordon Hayward going to the Celtics, most of the big name free agents have re-upped with their old teams and in the process, the most desirable free agent destinations are out of both salary cap space and room under the luxury tax threshold.

Some NBA free agent bargains to watch are:

Unrestricted Free Agents

Shabazz Muhammad, Minnesota Timberwolves, UFA

Muhammad’s agent should have pressed the panic button when the T-wolves rescinded their qualifying offer making him unrestricted.

The 14th overall pick in 2013  is still just 24-years-old. His experience on a bad Minnesota team makes him look like a black hole on offense and a questionable defender, but four different coaches in four years isn’t the way to develop any player.

This 6’6 wing with a 6’11 wingspan and a 37″ max vertical jump has averaged 10.8 points on 47.7 percent shooting in just 20.5 minutes over the past three years as a reserve and has shown potential to shoot the three.

Teams are looking at mature undrafted players to fill in the back end of their rosters. Muhammad is a way better option that doing that.

Dante Cunningham, New Orleans Pelicans, UFA

The 30-year-old veteran forward is considered a decent defender with a good three-point shot developed over the past two seasons. At 39.2 percent from three on 2.7 attempts last season, it shouldn’t be a surprise he thought there’d be more demand for his services when he opted out of his $3.1 million player option.

Undoubtedly a victim of unreasonable expectations, this is a player that can help a team right away.

Luke Babbitt, Miami Heat, UFA

The 6’9 combo forward does one thing well, it just happens to be the one thing every NBA team seems to need these days. He chucked up a three-ball every five minutes he was on the court for the Heat and he sunk 41.4 percent of them.

The 28-year-old isn’t a terrible rebounder and no one is looking to him for defense, but he legitimately stretches the floor and he’ll be cheap.

Derrick Williams, Cleveland Cavaliers, UFA

Almost completely off the free agent radar, Derrick Williams earned himself a second sixth chance with the Cavaliers last season when he survived two 10 day contracts and was picked up for the balance of the season.

The 2011 2nd overall draft pick bombed, but the 6’8 240 lb forward has talent and sometimes it takes longer for the school of hard knocks to make an impact than should normally be expected.

Williams shot 50.5 percent from the field and 40.4 percent from three in 25 games for the Cavs. At 26-years-old, he is still relatively young, an uber-athlete and he’ll be cheap. Odds are he’d take a non-guaranteed deal in a heartbeat.  No risk/high return, why hasn’t he gotten a camp invite yet?

Restricted Free Agents

This summer wasn’t as good for free agents as last summer (and it’s going to be worse next summer). Players are being screwed over in restricted free agency as teams refuse to bid against themselves,

Nerlens Noel, Dallas Mavericks, RFA

A big traditional center in a market that’s not rewarding big traditional centers, the Mavs can afford to wait out Noel as no team is going to try to steal him with a ludicrous offer sheet.

Noel should be more worried than he appears as well. The Mavs are sitting on salary cap space they could use to acquire one of the seemingly numerous available veteran traditional centers and get paid to do it with future draft picks.

Mason Plumlee, Denver Nuggets, RFA

Another big traditional center with no leverage in negotiations. He’ll be a backup next season if he stays in Denver and in his position, the qualifying offer should be starting to look good.

JaMychal Green, Memphis Grizzlies, RFA

JaMychal Green started 75 games for the Grizzlies last season and the 6’9 power forward became the ‘3-and-D’ player the previous season suggested he would. It’s actually surprising no other team took a serious run at him despite Memphis’ promise to match any offer sheet.

Green is type of young big man just about every NBA team wants and needs in today’s NBA and it shouldn’t surprise anyone if the Grizzlies have quietly been offered several sign-and-trade opportunities, but they seem content to wait things out in an attempt to get Green on the contract they want.

 

A few of the other recognizable free agents in need of a place to play include: Monta Ellis, Gerald Henderson, Tyler Zeller, Festus Ezeli and Nikola Mirotic.

There are still a lot of players waiting on the sidelines in free agency, but the money and the roster spots are quickly drying up. It won’t be long before restricted free agents will start thinking their best option may be that qualifying offer and unrestricted free agents are completely stuck between a veteran’s minimum deal or no deal at all.

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

 

NBA Free Agents LucMbah a Moute and Dante Cunningham

Raptors Need Some Cheap Veteran Help At Forward

Ever since the Toronto Raptors let James Johnson walk away in free agency a year ago, they’ve needed a cheap reliable veteran forward that can play both positions and doesn’t mind (too much) that he could lose his job to some young guy who isn’t better than him yet.

The Raptors have two All-Star guards with solid young backups, two really good forwards and way too many centers, but as the center market for trades is looking kind of iffy, they may have to sort through the bargain bin of remaining free agents to fill that obvious forward hole in the rotation until one or both of Pascal Siakam and OG Anunoby are ready to take it.

If president Masai Ujiri is swinging for the fences, he could take a run at Grizzlies restricted free agent power forward/center JaMychal Green with a sign-and-trade offer in the four-years $50-60 million range. Memphis loves him, but doesn’t want to pay him and so maybe there’s a chance, a slim chance they’d take the younger Jonas Valanciunas in return.

The 27-year-old Green is the big mobile type defender that fits the current NBA as is his developing three-point shot (33.3% 3FG on 45 attempts in 2015-16, 37.9% 3FG on 145 attempts last season.) He’d look really good in a Raptors uniform.

But it’s probably going to be tough to trade Valanciunas and get reasonable value back, so maybe one of the handful of overlooked free agent forwards could fit the bill.

The Pelicans 30-year-old forward  Dante Cunningham gave up $3.1 million to become a free agent this summer and it’s starting to get late in the game. Considered a versatile defender with limited offense who developed a three-point shot over the last two seasons (39.2% 3FG on 181 attempts last year), he’s already been passed by the secondary tier of free agents who signed on the cheap.

Forward Luc Richard Mbah a Moute will be 31 in September and he declined a $2.3 million player option with the Clippers in June. It’s previously been suggested by Rogers Michael Grange that the Raptors have shown some interest. Just like Cunningham, Mbah a Moute is considered a versatile defender with limited offense who has also been working on his three-point shot (39.1% 3FG on 110 attempts last year.)

As long as the price and the term are right, either Cunningham or Mbah a Moute could be a good fit on the Raptors.

Then there’s the 35-year-old Boris Diaw who was just waived by the Jazz because his numbers have fallen off a cliff and they could save $7 million by cutting him. There are still several players available that could provide a veteran presence if that’s all Ujiri wants? But the pickings are getting thin.

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_inside

Stephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

NBA Boston Celtics Jae Crowder and Utah Jazz Gordon Hayward

Celtics Pursuing A Sign And Trade For Gordon Hayward

The Celtics still don’t have enough salary cap space to sign Utah Jazz free agent Gordon Hayward to the max contract they promised, so they’ve been running around looking for someone to take on Marcus Smart, Jae Crowder and/or Avery Bradley and leave them with enough room to complete the deal as reported by Ramona Shelburne and Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN One of the better options, if the Jazz and Hayward will agree, would be a sign and trade for one of the players they are trying to move and possibly some of the other “assets” the Celtics could be forced to dump.

The Boston Celtics have been aggressively trying to create enough salary-cap room … by discussing trades involving Marcus Smart, Jae Crowder and Avery Bradley

The Jazz and Celtics discussed on Wednesday the possibility of including Crowder in a sign-and-trade agreement for Hayward

The amount the Celtics are short could be as low as $300,000 if they can jump thru enough less painful flaming hoops than giving away one of their players that has actual real trade value.

even if the team renounced the rights to Jonas Jerebko, James Young and Gerald Green, waived Jordan Mickey, left 2016 first-round pick Guerschon Yabusele in Europe this season and traded Demetrius Jackson’s partially guaranteed contract and Terry Rozier, Boston … is still about $300,000 short of his max.

From a practical standpoint, when teams know you are trying to dump a contract to create room to complete another deal, they are going to take advantage, but Boston does have the assets to grease just about anything if they want to.

A trade with a third team to create space or a sign and trade with the Jazz can accomplish the same thing. This will just come down to finding the “best” way to get it done.

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

 

NBA San Antonio Spurs LaMarcus Aldridge and Toronto Raptors Jonas Valanciunas

Raptors Should Just Go For It This Season

Already deep in luxury tax territory and unsuccessfully looking to dump contracts even at the expense of potentially getting worse, Toronto Raptors president Masai Ujiri should be looking to do more than just being a top four team in the Eastern Conference. He should got for it and take his shot at getting to the NBA Finals.

As Basketball Insiders senior writer Joel Brigham reported recently, overall the East has gotten weaker with Jimmy Butler, Paul George and Paul Millsap heading west. The top four in the East aren’t about to change, although maybe things between the top teams could become at least a little more interesting.

Cleveland, Boston, Toronto and Washington look almost certain to keep their top-four status in the conference simply by bringing back the same players they had a year ago. Add Milwaukee to that conversation, too

Chicago, Indiana and Atlanta all made the playoffs last year but each will vie for the conference’s worst record next season after losing their stars

Boston took the first steps towards becoming more competitive with the Cavs by getting Gordon Hayward’s commitment for next season. Although they still have more moves left to create the needed cap space to sign Hayward and they’ll probably want to do something about carrying four small forwards that all need to play next season.

Expect the Wizards to match anything restricted free agent Otto Porter signs on July 6th.

The Raptors will bring back starters Kyle Lowry and Serge Ibaka, but have lost rotation players P.J. Tucker and Patrick Patterson to free agency and are rumored to be looking to dump salary because of luxury tax concerns.

All three of these pretenders will be competitive during the regular season, but unless they have another major move up their sleeve, no one is going to give them more than a puncher’s chance at knocking off a healthy Cavs squad in the playoffs.

The Celtics with Isaiah Thomas, Al Horford and Gordon Hayward still need rebounding and they have the trade pieces to go get a difference maker. Of course the Celtics with Jaylen Brown, Jayson Tatum and Brooklyn’s 2018 first round draft pick could choose to tread water as a 50-win team while their young guys develop instead?

Built around John Wall and Bradley Beal, the Wizards will have continuity and if they can find some offense off the bench, it can be argued they don’t need anything else, but they really need that bench to step up.

The Raptors are built around Lowry, DeMar DeRozan and Ibaka, but like the Celtics, they need another impact player if they are going to be more than pretenders in the East.

(Players shown in the positions they would like to play)

The Raptors could make do with the players they have, even if it isn’t practical luxury tax wise. Delon Wright has the size to play on the wing. DeMarre Carroll can play both forward spots and Ibaka can play power forward (like he has for most of his career.) But this isn’t the best use of team resources.

The favored move seems to be to find a team to take on Carroll’s salary to solve the luxury tax issue, but this doesn’t help re-balance the roster or help move the needle of the team’s outlook for next season.

No, Ujiri needs to go big if this team is going to be significantly better than last season. He needs to add an impact player, preferably while reducing his luxury tax position.

Once teams can actually start signing free agents on July 6th and reality sets in around the league, trade season can start in earnest and there is one multiple-time All-Star rumored to have shopped around at the draft because he wasn’t happy, the Spurs LaMarcus Aldridge.

The almost 32-year-old five-time All-Star power forward wasn’t named to the All-Star team for first time since 2012 last year. He posted his lowest scoring (17.3 points per game), fewest field goals made (6.9) and worst rebounding numbers (7.3) since his rookie season way back in 2006-07. However, he was still an impact player and as has been a big man trend, he added a three-point shot and hit 41 percent of his 56 attempts last season.

In addition to Aldridge being unhappy, general manager R.C. Burford isn’t going to have star point guard Tony Parker to start the season, if at all. It doesn’t look like free agency is going all that well either besides the return of Patty Mills, so an aging Spurs team could use some young ready-to-go players for next season.

If the Raptors sent Jonas Valanciunas, Cory Joseph and Lucas Nogueira to the Spurs for Aldridge, the Raptors would get another impact player who can shoot plus shave $4.5 million off their payroll, and the Spurs would get to fill some holes with a young starting center, a backup point guard they know well and a young developing big man.

The Raptors tax situation becomes a lot more palatable and the players fall into roles they prefer/fit.

If Aldridge can re-gain his All-Star form of a year ago, which should be a lot easier in the NBA East, Toronto would at least get a second look as a potential competitor for the Cavs come playoff time.

At this point in early July, nothing is set in stone, however, expect the Celtics to make a move to address those rebounding concerns, look for the Wizards bench to improve and the Raptors will do … something.

Ujiri created a three-year window with the contracts of DeRozan, Lowry and Ibaka, so he may as well go for it this year if he can and there may be no better opportunity to snag an impact player than the situation in San Antonio with Aldridge. That is unless Danny Ainge beats him to it.

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

   Featured image courtesy of Larry Millson

 

 

 

 

NBA Toronto Raptors Patrick Patterson

Raptors Lose Patrick Patterson To The Thunder

It was inevitable that the Toronto Raptors were going to lose Patrick Patterson to free agency this summer because of luxury tax constraints, but at least he’s heading West to the Oklahoma City Thunder on a three-year $16.4 million dollar deal. The Raptors will only have to face him twice a year.

Patterson was the last of the four players Toronto received from the Sacramento Kings in December 2013 in the Rudy Gay trade that turned the Raptors from soft perennial losers into a four-time playoff team. He will be missed.

Once again Patterson should have a solid shot at the starting job at the start of the season and maybe in Oklahoma City the role suites him better. For reasons no one could understand, including Patterson, he could never get comfortable in the starting line-up with the Raptors and it wasn’t because they didn’t need him in that role.

The big forward was an above average defender with genuine three-point range and over the past four seasons he figured prominently in a number of Raptors victories. However, his three-point shot had a nasty habit of disappearing at precisely the wrong time.

Raptors fans will remember this career 36.8 percent three-point shooter hit on only 30 percent of his attempts from three during the run to the Eastern Conference Finals two springs ago, going just 3-11 in those last three games against Cleveland.

In this year’s playoffs, Patterson shot 30.8 percent from three over the 10 games, but only 22.2 percent in the Cavs second round sweep of the Raptors. He was part of the reason president Masai Ujiri lamented about the team’s three-point shooters not hitting three-point shots in the playoffs.

Those playoff blips aside, Toronto consistently played better with Patterson on the court. He was a ball mover and reliable defender. The classic glue-guy and the Thunder are sure to appreciate the stability he can bring to a team at both ends of the court.

The hardest part about seeing Patterson leave for the Thunder is, at that salary, he’d still look really good in a Raptors uniform.

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

 

NBA Minnesota Timberwolves Shabazz Muhammad and Miami Heat James Johnson and Toronto Raptors Patrick Patterson

What Is The Next Shoe To Drop For The Toronto Raptors

It feels like things are stalling out in the NBA for trades and free agency as teams wait on Gordon Hayward and the few remaining free agents with profile to decide where they want to go/ who wants them plus what is likely the inevitable return of Otto Porter to the Wizards after he signs an offer sheet with somebody. But until there’s some clarity, the next shoe to drop for teams like the Toronto Raptors is left hanging up in the air.

The Raptors aren’t the only ones looking to dump salary, the Bucks, Celtics? and likely and handful of other teams are also waiting for the big picture to work itself out as well. Toronto, however, after coming to terms with Kyle Lowry and Serge Ibaka is in a must deal versus might or would like to deal situation.

Toronto Raptors NBA

It likely isn’t as bad as being $17 million over the luxury tax line in Toronto. The first year salaries of Lowry and Ibaka combined could be about $5 million less than the three-year average, VanVleet is not guaranteed and can still be released, and their first round draft pick isn’t signed/could still be traded, but if paying the tax is a big deal for president Masai Ujiri, he still needs to move at least one of Jonas Valanciunas, DeMarre Carroll or (for a partial tax savings) Cory Joseph.

The most obvious shoe to drop is at point guard.

The Raptors have four and nobody needs four healthy point guards on their roster. The easy solution is to waive the non-guaranteed deal of VanVleet, but he’s a cheap option as a third string backup and Ujiri has been noticed trying to shop the $7.6 million expiring contract of Joseph.

A potential deal with Indiana apparently fell though, but solid young backup point guards are a reasonably valuable commodity. Joseph is trade-able.

Ideally Joseph would be packaged with Carroll or Valanciunas so Ujiri could get something of value back and still dip below tax line.

Even if the fan base couldn’t hold the door open fast enough to help Carroll move on, he is still a useful player at a position of need, assuming he can stay healthy. So, Ujiri can’t be too fussy if it’s his traditional slow-footed rebounding center Valanciunas or the disappointing ‘3-and-D’ forward Carroll who he manages to off load to save the tax. Both players are starters and would have a useful role coming off the bench in what is expected to be a higher scoring small ball focused Raptors rotation next season.

However, if Ujiri can find a way to fill the gaps in the rotation caused by their departure, internally, by way of trade or free agency, then both Valanciunas and Carroll could be on their way out for cheaper options.

While what could come back by way of trade is harder to judge, if Ujiri could move both Carroll and Valanciunas, there are still some interesting options in free agency.

The Timberwolves have withdrawn the qualifying offer from small forward Shabazz Muhammad.

Combo forward James Johnson is available and a known quantity in Toronto.

Patrick Patterson becomes a viable option who knows the Raptors systems and has been a very effective, if at times frustrating, glue guy.

Another option could be Clipper free agent Luc Mbah Moute who evolved into a 39 percent three-point shooter last season.

At this point in free agency, the list of second tier options is long. However, the first step is clearing enough space below the luxury tax line to make room.

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

 

 

NBA Toronto Raptors Kyle Lowry

Kyle Lowry Comes Home To The Raptors

Kyle Lowry got his salary and president Masai Ujiri got his term as the Toronto Raptors re-acquired their free agent All-Star point guard on a three-year $100 million deal.

It’s more money per year than most analysts were expecting Lowry could command, but it only commits Toronto to Lowry until age 34 when he should still be still playing his best basketball. A compromise to be sure that matches the contract terms of DeMar DeRozan (player option) and Serge Ibaka.

Ensuring no one had any doubt after the fact that Toronto was where he wanted to be, Lowry posted “Home” on The Players Tribune.

When I had to make my free-agency decision, there was a lot going through my head, a lot of roads my mind was traveling down. Family, first and foremost, and what’s going to make them happy, and give them the best life. Basketball, of course, and where I’d like to play for these next several years. And then there was also the gut-check aspect — just what I was feeling in my heart.

But for me, at the end of the day, this was an easy decision. And all of those roads … they all led me back to the same place: home.

They all led me back to Toronto.

The ability to re-sign All-Star DeMar DeRozan last summer and All-Star Kyle Lowry this summer is something Raptors would have been hard pressed to even imagine before the Masai Ujiri era started in Toronto.

Add in Serge Ibaka agreeing to re-up for another three years and there is almost a semblance of hope that this organization will not slide back into another long dark stretch as an NBA Lottery team with little hope every time a key free agent has the option to leave.

Ujiri can get good players to re-up in Toronto and he can do it on reasonable terms. Now if only he could get his corporate masters at MLSE to open the vault and let him spend the kind of money that needs to be committed to have more than a ghost of a chance at reaching the NBA Finals. But, maybe, one thing at a time.

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

 

NBA Brooklyn Nets Quincy Acy

Suns Or Nets Could Take On A Raptors Salary Dump

If as it appears Raptors president Masai Ujiri is looking hard for a way to dump salary, then his best and possibly only options are with the Nets and Suns, but it’s going to cost him. When everyone knows you are desperately trying to move a player, they are going to demand a pound of flesh.

Neither the Nets nor the Suns are under any delusions about where their respective franchises currently stand, but they do have salary cap space and they know that can be a very valuable commodity to a team like Toronto.

Maybe they take on DeMarre Carroll’s two years and $30 million, but not without a nice sweetener like a first round draft pick or a young player still on his rookie deal.

Ujiri can look elsewhere for unbalanced trades for the more desirable Cory Joseph or Jonas Valanciunas, but those will likely be “basketball trades” as opposed to straight salary dumps and when it comes to moving Valanciunas, he’ll want to stick that young man out West. Ujiri wouldn’t want his starting center coming back to embarrass him twice a year at home in the Eastern Conference.

In dealing with the Nets, Ujiri could ask for the feel good move of requesting forward Quincy Acy and his $1.7 million non-guaranteed deal back. Acy was a popular player in Toronto three season ago for his hustle and the 26-year-old has shot 40 percent from three on 139 attempts over the past two years, so maybe he’s worth another look.

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

NBA Toronto Raptors Serge Ibaka

Serge Ibaka Returns To The Raptors

After the Magic traded Serge Ibaka to the Raptors at the trade deadline, it came out that Toronto was the only destination the big man had indicated he would re-sign with next summer and apparently he will. Adrian Wojnarowski reports Ibaka has agreed to a team friendly three year $65 million deal.

If anyone is still wondering why a deal with Kyle Lowry hasn’t been put to bed yet, look no further than the number of years Ibaka got.

President Masai Ujiri did get a very favorable deal with Ibaka.

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

NBA Toronto Raptors Cory Joseph and Jonas Valanciunas and DeMarre Carroll

Are The Raptors Still Afraid Of The Luxury Tax?

Just ignore the annual comments from whomever the Raptors GM is this year about being willing and able to spend into the Tax, by all appearances, the Raptors are going cheap… again. Maybe we’re jumping to conclusions, but this team is still afraid of the NBA Luxury Tax.

As the negotiations drag out with Kyle Lowry and Serge Ibaka, almost certainly about dollars and length of contract, the Raptors have already lost P.J. Tucker to the Rockets because of what has become their ongoing fear of spending into the tax.

The rumors about Toronto trying to dump salary in order to “make room” under the luxury tax are coming more frequently and gaining credibility.

This is especially disappointing in light of the overwhelming fan support in Toronto which boasted the third highest attendance in the NBA last season and the very deep pockets of their corporate owners (Rogers and Bell own MLSE) where the profit or loss of the Raptors wouldn’t even make a footnote in their annual statement.

If moving out salaries is the only way Masai Ujiri is allowed to re-sign Kyle Lowry and Serge Ibaka, then MLSE has seriously handcuffed the Raptors president.

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

 

NBA Toronto Raptors P.J. Tucker

As Raptors Dither, P.J. Tucker Joins The Rockets

The Raptors wanted P.J. Tucker back next season and they made the 32-year-old a high-ball offer of $33 million over three years, but he opted to take less money and join former Clippers superstar Chris Paul in Houston with the Rockets. As the Raptors dither with free agent Kyle Lowry, president Masai Ujiri couldn’t get done what Tucker really wanted fast enough.

The Raptors didn’t give up much to get Tucker at the trade deadline in February, but this was a guy Ujiri really wanted back. A veteran with a physical presence that isn’t always easy to find. While Tucker doesn’t do much for a team on the stats sheet, he does make an impact on the court.

It really looks like Tucker’s decision was all about going with the sure thing. At the locker clean out media availability, Tucker made it pretty clear he wasn’t coming back unless the team re-signed Kyle Lowry.

“I think fit is everything,” Tucker said about his impending free agency. “I want to go to a team I can help push to the next level.”

“I look to be a piece going towards something. It’s not just the money. It’s a bunch of things that goes into it and seeing where I fit.

“You got to let (free agency) play out.”

Faced with making a decision to join a very good Rockets team that has Paul committed to playing there next season versus agreeing to return to a Raptors team that still hasn’t been able to come to terms with Lowry or Serge Ibaka, it wasn’t all that hard a decision to make when the dollars are this close.

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

 

NBA Cleveland Cavaliers LeBron James

LeBron James Is Against NBA CBA Maximum Salary Limits

As Stephen Curry agrees to a new NBA record $201 million contract which will be surpassed within a year, LeBron James couldn’t help but note just how much more valuable Curry is to the Golden State Warriors franchise than the NBA CBA maximum salary limits permit.

James is right of course and by putting maximum salary limits on what players can earn, the NBA has created the possibility of super teams coming together and dominating the Association.

However, it should be pointed out that James is a senior member of the player’s association that collectively bargained for the limits in the current CBA.

If there was no limit on an individual player’s salary, the superstars in the NBA could command nearly the entire salary cap space. Teams would pay it. James would get offers that meant the rest of the roster he’d be playing with would be on NBA minimum salaries. He’d likely take it to. That $400 million contract number would become very possible if he wasn’t limited by the CBA.

However, the potential future owner of an NBA franchise might not like the power a change like this to the CBA would give to players like James, Curry, Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook, Paul George or James Harden and it’s been proven that without limits, owners can’t help themselves and their often huge mistakes would become franchise crippling.

So maybe James the player was acting like James the future NBA owner during those CBA negotiations?

 

 

Stephen_Brotherston_insideStephen Brotherston covers the Toronto Raptors and visiting NBA teams at the Air Canada Centre and is a member of the Professional Basketball Writers Association.

 

 

 

NBA Minnesota Timberwolves Jeff Teague

Instant NBA Free Agent Action At Midnight

There is no waiting for the morning for these NBA free agents:

Jeff Teague to the Timberwolves

Tony Snell stays in Milwaukee

Patty Mills stays in San Antonio

Stephen Curry nears $201 million deal to stay in Golden State

Cristiano Felicio to stay in Chicago

Shaun Livingston to stay in Golden State

Blake Griffin to stay with the Clippers

Nene to remain in Houston

Remember none of these announcements are “signed deals” as teams cannot actually sign free agents until July 6th.